Algeria Television http://algeriatelevision.com/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 20:35:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://algeriatelevision.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/algeria-television-icon.png Algeria Television http://algeriatelevision.com/ 32 32 The slow and uncertain pace of Saudi-Syrian rapprochement https://algeriatelevision.com/the-slow-and-uncertain-pace-of-saudi-syrian-rapprochement/ https://algeriatelevision.com/the-slow-and-uncertain-pace-of-saudi-syrian-rapprochement/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 18:27:47 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/the-slow-and-uncertain-pace-of-saudi-syrian-rapprochement/

On May 26, Syrian Minister of Tourism Mohammed Rami Martini has become the first Syrian government official to visit Saudi Arabia since the civil war began in 2011. Martini’s Journey speculation fueled on a normalization between Riyadh and Damascus, as it coincided with a series of positive developments in Syrian-Saudi relations. On May 3, Saudi intelligence chief Lt. Gen. Khaled Humaidan met his Syrian counterpart Ali Mamlouk in Damascus. A few hours after Martini’s arrival in Riyadh, Bouthaina Shabaan, a prominent adviser to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, expressed optimism on a rapid breakthrough in the Saudi-Syrian normalization talks.

Despite these developments, there is reason to be skeptical about a rapid resumption of relations. From Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman recognized that “Bashar remains” In a March 2018 interview, there have been repeated unsuccessful attempts to facilitate normalization between Syria and Saudi Arabia. Such attempt in 2018 saw Saudi Arabia offer reconstruction investments to Syria if Assad breaks with Iran and Hezbollah. that of Saudi Arabia reluctance to imitate the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, which reopened their embassies in Damascus in December 2018, further underscore the arduous path towards a Riyadh-Damascus rapprochement.

While recent events could be more than a false dawn, the most likely scenario is a gradual restoration of bilateral relations between Saudi Arabia and Syria. A Saudi commentator with close ties to the ruling family told Al-Monitor that rapid normalization between Saudi Arabia and Syria was unlikely due to anti-Assad sentiments in the kingdom. The commentator noted that these sentiments date back to the assassination of Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri in 2005 and have intensified due to Saudi media coverage of the Syrian conflict, “which widely covered Assad’s atrocities and called the regime Alawite apostate “. The commentator argued that the UAE could ignore anti-Assad sentiments more easily than Saudi Arabia, as the UAE’s population is mostly made up of non-Arab foreign nationals, and Riyadh will gradually engage with Assad to mitigate public reactions.

Harun al-Aswad, a Syrian journalist based in Turkey, echoed these views in an interview with Al-Monitor. Aswad predicted that “relations between Riyadh and Damascus will not suddenly return” but argued that a series of rumors and leaks “would pave the way for the gradual return of relations between the two countries without causing shock in public opinion. public “. Aswad is convinced that Saudi Arabia’s normalization with Syria will eventually continue because “the Syrian opposition has proven its failure” and Riyadh cannot “invest in rebels who work as mercenaries in Libya and Azerbaijan instead of doing so. in the face of Iranian expansion in Syria “.

Even if Riyadh and Damascus eventually normalize their relations, Syria faces an uphill struggle to return to the Arab League and is unlikely to receive Saudi reconstruction investments.

Egypt and the United Arab Emirates have repeatedly claimed that Syria’s suspension from the Arab League has done more harm than good. Arab countries that have consistently engaged with Damascus, such as Iraq, Algeria and Oman, share this point of view. Saudi Arabia’s entry into the pro-engagement bloc could strengthen Assad’s acceptability in the region, but it is unlikely to change the positions of Qatar and Kuwait.

On March 12, Qatari Foreign Minister Mohammed bin Abdul Rahman Al Thani say the reasons for the expulsion of Assad from the Arab League remained valid, and on May 30 confirmed that Qatar did not intend to normalize with Syria. Kuwait insisted in 2018 that he would not reopen his embassy in Damascus unless the Arab League gave him the green light. Kuwait’s fundraising efforts for humanitarian aid to Syria complicate more its ability to embrace the Assad regime.

The re-election of Bashar al-Assad for a new seven-year term could soften the positions of Qatar and Kuwait over time, but there is no guarantee that members of the Arab League will unite around Assad’s reinstatement.

Saudi Arabia’s prospects for investing in Syria are also slim. The Caesar Civilian Protection Act sanctions are a major obstacle to Saudi investments in Syria. UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed openly criticized these sanctions because they restrict the participation of the private sector in the reconstruction of Syria. However, the United States dismissed The Abu Dhabi critics and insisted that the Caesar Law sanctions should remain in effect until an inclusive political settlement is found in Syria. Due to Mohammed bin Salman’s unpopularity in the US Congress and his icy relationship with the Biden administration, Saudi Arabia is unlikely to be more successful than the UAE in changing US views on the Caesar law.

Even if an unlikely breakthrough in Syria’s constitutional negotiations causes the United States to review its sanctions against Damascus, Saudi Arabia and Syria are both wary of the consequences of economic cooperation. Saudi Arabia is also concerned that investments in the Syrian economy may unintentionally bring material benefits to Iran. Bassam Barabandi, a former Syrian diplomat, told Al-Monitor that Saudi Arabia had previously tried to counter Iranian influence in Lebanon and Iraq “by supporting moderate Shiite and Sunni political leaders and it failed.” Barabandi said he believed Saudi support for Assad would “empower Iran for free.”

Syrian officials view Saudi Arabia with great suspicion and are unlikely to accept Saudi investments if they dilute the Syrian-Iranian alliance. Former Russian Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Andrei Baklanov, who engaged with Assad at the start of the civil war, told Al-Monitor: “Many people in Syria feel offended by Riyadh’s treacherous stance,” adding: “It will not be easy for Saudi Arabia to regain its credibility in Syria. Baklanov recalls that Assad views Saudi support for the Syrian opposition as a thankless move, as Syria aligned itself with Saudi Arabia against Iraq during the Gulf War of 1990-91.

If Saudi Arabia does not review its restrictive policies on Omra hajj visas and work visa for Syrian nationals, Damascus’ mistrust of Riyadh is likely to persist.

A decade after the start of the Syrian conflict, Assad has a wider range of partners in the Arab world than at any time since 2011. A normalization of Saudi-Syrian relations would strengthen Assad’s claims that he is no longer isolated from the international community but would do little. improve Syria’s increasingly dire economic outlook or encourage the international community to support an Assad-led Syrian reconstruction process.


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A quartet of law firms merge to create a regional practice in French-speaking Africa https://algeriatelevision.com/a-quartet-of-law-firms-merge-to-create-a-regional-practice-in-french-speaking-africa/ https://algeriatelevision.com/a-quartet-of-law-firms-merge-to-create-a-regional-practice-in-french-speaking-africa/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 16:17:33 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/a-quartet-of-law-firms-merge-to-create-a-regional-practice-in-french-speaking-africa/

Practices from Algeria, Morocco, Guinea and Ivory Coast join forces to form ADNA with further expansion in Africa planned

(lr) Salimatou Diallo, Safia Fassi-Fihri, Sydney Domoraud and Foued Bourabiat

Four law firms in North and West Africa have merged with the ambition to help develop the “next generation of lawyers on the continent” by creating a fully integrated African law firm focused on Francophone countries .

ADNA has offices in Algeria, Morocco, Guinea and Ivory Coast, bringing together Bourabiat Associés, BFR & Associés, SD Avocats and EMIRE Partners respectively.

With five partners and 20 other employees, his main areas of practice will be business, banking and finance, projects and litigation with a particular focus on the agriculture, energy, infrastructure and mining sectors. . He is a member of the Pan-African Alliance of Law Firms Africa Legal Network.

The managers of the boutiques that make up the merged company are longtime friends, all four having spent a significant part of their careers in large international companies, mainly based in Paris.

Conakry-based Salimatou Diallo, who is the managing partner of the new company, said it took two years to structure the deal which includes profit sharing between the partners. She said the plan was to expand to other French-speaking countries with ongoing discussions with two other companies, although more deals are not imminent.

She added, “We have all worked in international firms and understand the importance of having a regional platform for clients who will be drawn to our credentials and experience in various practice areas.

Diallo founded SD Avocats in 2013 after spending seven years in the Paris office of Herbert Smith Freehills (HSF), where she was of counsel. She has dual Franco-Guinean nationality and her practice focuses on the energy and natural resources sectors in Francophone Africa.

Foued Bourabiat was at HSF in Paris at the same time as Diallo, founding his firm of Algiers Bourabiat Associés in 2012. He advises investors and credit institutions in their investments and financing operations in Algeria and in the MENA region.

Its co-founder Safia Fassi-Fihri worked in the office of Bredin Pratt, Ashurst and Gide Loyrette Nouel in Cassablanca before moving internally as general counsel of the Moroccan wealth management company RMA Capital. She founded BFR & Associés in 2015.

ADNA’s quartet of founding partners is complemented by Sydney Domoraud, managing partner of EMIRE based in Abidjan, which focuses on the energy, mining, infrastructure and real estate sectors. Before creating EMIRE in 2017, he spent four years at Orrick, notably on secondment to his London office, then founded Orrick’s partner in Abidjan, Orrick RCI in 2014.

Pan-African law firms remain scarce, with most independent firms offering cross-border advice through network membership while many international firms continue to serve the market from offices in London and Paris.

In April, Dentons agreed to partner with Nigerian law firm Adepetun Caxton-Martins Agbor & Segun to become the second law firm in the world to operate in Africa’s largest economy.


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A quartet of companies from North and West Africa merge https://algeriatelevision.com/a-quartet-of-companies-from-north-and-west-africa-merge/ https://algeriatelevision.com/a-quartet-of-companies-from-north-and-west-africa-merge/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 14:58:20 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/a-quartet-of-companies-from-north-and-west-africa-merge/

Practices from Algeria, Morocco, Guinea and Ivory Coast join forces to form ADNA with further expansion in Africa planned

(lr) Salimatou Diallo, Safia Fassi-Fihri, Sydney Domoraud and Foued Bourabiat

Four law firms in North and West Africa have merged with the ambition to help develop the “next generation of lawyers on the continent” by creating a fully integrated African law firm focused on Francophone countries .

ADNA has offices in Algeria, Morocco, Guinea and Ivory Coast, bringing together Bourabiat Associés, BFR & Associés, SD Avocats and EMIRE Partners respectively.

With five partners and 20 other employees, his main areas of practice will be business, banking and finance, projects and litigation with a particular focus on the agriculture, energy, infrastructure and mining sectors. . He is a member of the Pan-African Alliance of Law Firms Africa Legal Network.

The managers of the boutiques that make up the merged company are longtime friends, all four having spent a significant part of their careers in large international companies, mainly based in Paris.

Conakry-based Salimatou Diallo, who is the managing partner of the new company, said it took two years to structure the deal which includes profit sharing between the partners. She said the plan was to expand to other French-speaking countries with ongoing discussions with two other companies, although more deals are not imminent.

She added, “We have all worked in international firms and understand the importance of having a regional platform for clients who will be drawn to our credentials and experience in various practice areas.

Diallo founded SD Avocats in 2013 after spending seven years in the Paris office of Herbert Smith Freehills (HSF), where she was of counsel. She has dual Franco-Guinean nationality and her practice focuses on the energy and natural resources sectors in Francophone Africa.

Foued Bourabiat was at HSF in Paris at the same time as Diallo, founding his firm of Algiers Bourabiat Associés in 2012. He advises investors and credit institutions in their investments and financing operations in Algeria and in the MENA region.

Its co-founder Safia Fassi-Fihri worked in the office of Bredin Pratt, Ashurst and Gide Loyrette Nouel in Cassablanca before moving internally as general counsel of the Moroccan wealth management company RMA Capital. She founded BFR & Associés in 2015.

ADNA’s quartet of founding partners is complemented by Sydney Domoraud, managing partner of EMIRE based in Abidjan, which focuses on the energy, mining, infrastructure and real estate sectors. Before creating EMIRE in 2017, he spent four years at Orrick, notably on secondment to his London office, then founded Orrick’s partner in Abidjan, Orrick RCI in 2014.

Pan-African law firms remain scarce, with most independent firms offering cross-border advice through network membership while many international firms continue to serve the market from offices in London and Paris.

In April, Dentons agreed to partner with Nigerian law firm Adepetun Caxton-Martins Agbor & Segun to become the second law firm in the world to operate in Africa’s largest economy.


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Israeli soldiers disguised as Arabs kill 2 Palestinian security agents, one fighter https://algeriatelevision.com/israeli-soldiers-disguised-as-arabs-kill-2-palestinian-security-agents-one-fighter/ https://algeriatelevision.com/israeli-soldiers-disguised-as-arabs-kill-2-palestinian-security-agents-one-fighter/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 22:38:22 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/israeli-soldiers-disguised-as-arabs-kill-2-palestinian-security-agents-one-fighter/

DUBAI: For Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip, “home” is a concept that rarely conjures images of security and stability.

Israel and Hamas have waged four short but savage wars since the militant group took control of this fragment of territory in 2007.

With each wave of violence comes a new cycle of destruction and reconstruction, a “recycling of pain,” as Gaza-based artist Mohamed Abusal told Arab News.

In late May, tens of thousands of Palestinians returned to their homes in Gaza to inspect the damage after 11 days of fighting – the most serious escalation of hostilities since the 2014 war.

Tens of thousands of Palestinians returned to their homes in Gaza to inspect the damage after 11 days of fighting and shelling by Israeli forces. (AFP / File Photos)

According to Palestinian officials, at least 2,000 homes have been destroyed and 15,000 damaged by the latest wave of violence, further degrading the already fragile humanitarian situation in Gaza, long stifled by an Israeli and Egyptian blockade.

Gaza had yet to recover from the 2014 war when fighting resumed on May 10. Older buildings now stand like crumbling tombstones next to recently shattered buildings. It is a sight too familiar to the inhabitants of the territory.

To help redefine Gaza’s ravaged urban topography, Palestinian architect Salem Al-Qudwa has developed a series of do-it-yourself, flexible, eco-friendly and affordable house designs.

The innovative design means units can be built on sand or rubble and easily nested, allowing extended families to live under one roof – a potential lifeline for widows or orphans from recent fighting.

“These are houses that can empower the community in Gaza,” said Al-Qudwa, a member of the Conflict and Peace with Religion and Public Life program at Harvard Divinity School.

Palestinian architect Salem Al-Qudwa

“The Israelis have destroyed multi-storey buildings and plunged their residents into poverty. They lost everything. That’s the problem right now, this never-ending cycle of destruction and reconstruction, but, more importantly, the destruction of the physical and social fabric of Gazan society.

Al-Qudwa was dismayed to see a repeat of the havoc wrought in Gaza in 2014.

“These attacks pushed back Gaza for decades, destroying infrastructure in many parts of the city as well as the social fabric, which is crucial for housing,” he said. “Now the 2021 conflict pushes Gaza back 50 years. “

The 2014 war destroyed around 18,000 homes, leaving around 100,000 Palestinians homeless. However, the temporary wooden structures built by international aid agencies involved in post-war reconstruction were not suited to the needs of large families and did not provide adequate temperature controls.

Instead of consulting locals on how to proceed with the reconstruction of Gaza, aid agencies turned to foreign architects, “coming to replace our social structure with a mud house, a sandbag or a shelter in wood, ”Al-Qudwa said.

GAZA WAR COST

* 77,000 – Gazans displaced inside the country by the May conflict.

* 2,000 – Number of homes destroyed.

As governments and relief agencies pour money back into the reconstruction effort in Gaza, Al-Qudwa fears that the same fragile structures will be built, preventing residents from obtaining sustainable housing that represents the stability, permanence and hope for the future.

Al-Qudwa, who was born in 1976 to a Palestinian family in Benghazi, Libya, returned to Gaza at the age of 21 to study architectural engineering at the Islamic University of Gaza. He then obtained a doctorate. from the Oxford School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes University in the United Kingdom.

In 2020, he moved to the United States with his American-Palestinian family after earning a scholarship at Harvard Divinity School.

While working for Islamic Relief Worldwide, Al-Qudwa created the Poor and Damaged House Rehabilitation Project, which designed houses ranging from modest single rooms to spacious houses with communal courtyards, for more than 160 families in low income.

“I helped them build a kitchen, a bathroom and a bedroom and for them it was like they had a castle,” he said.

Prototype home design for the Gaza Strip allowing for future vertical incremental expansion for families affected by conflict. (Provided)

The project was so transformative that it was shortlisted for the World Habitat Award and received a 2018 commendation.

“The project undertaken with Islamic Relief allowed me to work on characterizing reconstruction projects in terms of feasibility,” Al-Qudwa said. It also taught her the importance of taking into account what communities really want in the form of sustainable and sustainable housing.

“This led me to see the need for simple architecture as well as a revaluation of traditional construction techniques, in connection with the participation of residents in the process of designing and building their houses.

Gaza’s minimalist architecture is the product of its dire circumstances. But Al-Qudwa sees his homeland’s rudimentary urban landscape, and even its shortage of building materials, as an opportunity for more positive social transformation.

Part of the challenge in Gaza comes from the Israeli blockade in place since 2007, which limits access to some building materials.

Al-Qudwa sees his homeland’s rudimentary urban landscape, and even its shortage of building materials, as an opportunity for more positive social transformation. (Provided)

Before the occupation, limestone was a material commonly used in local architecture. It is now far too expensive to import from the West Bank, making concrete from Israel the most popular material of choice.

Al-Qudwa is developing plans for three five-story concrete houses, each with proper insulation and built on solid foundations – in stark contrast to the emergency and transitional structures offered by aid agencies.

Unlike the monotonous block structures typically forged from concrete, Al-Qudwa uses the material creatively, enlivening his designs with nods to traditional Arabic motifs, incorporating lattice screens, brick patterns and even shared lessons.

Each structure has a row of columns, allowing additional floors to be added at a later date. “They are ‘columns of hope’ because with columns you get the idea that something will be added to the structure in a certain period of time,” Al-Qudwa said.

As he has shown through his designs, there are many ways to create low cost homes that are attractive and also maintain a sense of community even when resources are scarce.

As the Palestinians pick up the pieces of the latest carnage, Al-Qudwa’s work offers a glimmer of hope for a more permanent future, both structurally and psychologically. (Provided)

In addition, its new prototypes use solar water heaters, gray water recycling and rainwater harvesting systems – all crucial design elements in a region that has long suffered from power cuts and shortages. of water.

Al-Qudwa’s enduring designs run counter to other local reconstruction strategies, including Rawabi, which means “The Hills” in Arabic, the first town planned for and by Palestinians in the West Bank near Birzeit and Ramallah.

Spanning 6.3 square kilometers, the monotonous block-style structures are arranged in rows, similar to those found in Israeli settlements erected in the West Bank.

As the Palestinians pick up the pieces of the latest carnage, Al-Qudwa’s work offers a glimmer of hope for a more permanent future, both structurally and psychologically.

——————–

Twitter: @rebeccaaprocteur




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Thanks from a Grateful Nation | Stories | Notre-Dame Review https://algeriatelevision.com/thanks-from-a-grateful-nation-stories-notre-dame-review/ https://algeriatelevision.com/thanks-from-a-grateful-nation-stories-notre-dame-review/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/thanks-from-a-grateful-nation-stories-notre-dame-review/

Eugene D. Dollard was a freshman at Notre Dame, barely 18, when he left school to answer his country’s call.

It was 1943 and the United States was in World War II, fighting the Nazis in Europe and the forces of totalitarianism around the world. Dollard would serve in the United States Navy in Europe, the Mediterranean and the Pacific – and would witness more death and brutality than most men experience in their lifetime.

Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Bysiek

Dollard ’49, from Hamlin, New York, is now 96 years old. On June 9, he received the Legion of Honor of France in a ceremony in Fairpoint, New York.

“I’m part of the fortunes,” says Dollard, who was touched by the ceremony. It brought back memories of many military friends and comrades, some of whom gave their lives in war and others who died in the years that followed.

He received the badge of Knight in the National Order of the Legion of Honor – Knight in the National Order of the Legion of Honor. It was presented by Jérémie Robert, Consul General of France in New York.

The Legion of Honor is the highest order of French merit, created in 1802 by Napoleon Bonaparte. While membership is generally reserved for French citizens, foreign nationals who have served France may receive the honor.

In 2004, which marked the 60th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, French President Jacques Chirac decided to honor American WWII veterans who fought on French soil during that war. Several hundred American veterans have so far received the Legion of Honor for their service.

“France sees the great importance and significance of what was accomplished through our alliance with the United States during World War II. We believe that it is essential to thank all the great heroes who helped liberate our soil from the terrors of Nazism and who helped guarantee our freedom, our democracy, our values ​​and our way of life while there is still time. », Indicates a written statement from the Consul of France. Office.

Dollard was only 17 when he arrived in Notre-Dame. He moved to Zahm Hall and started classes. But the nation was preparing its war operation.

Many students had already left to join the US military. Military service and training have long been part of Notre-Dame’s tradition. In April 1942, much of the campus became a military camp with the establishment of the V-7 Naval Program to train Navy officers. About 12,000 officers were trained during the war years, when only a few hundred civilian students remained.

Dollard's Legion of Honor
Jérémie Robert, Consul General of France in New York, presents Eugène Dollard ’49 with the Legion of Honor. Photo courtesy of the French Consulate in New York

After a semester, Dollard enlisted in the US Navy. After three months of training, including a shooting school, he was posted to the US Naval Amphibious Division. His unit left Hoboken, New Jersey, on the new USS Henrico, sailing to Great Britain.

Dollard participated in the D-Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, the largest maritime invasion in history. The operation began the liberation of France and ultimately all of Western Europe, leading to the Allied victory on the Western Front.

“We welcomed the first wave in Normandy,” recalls Dollard in a telephone interview. His ship carried part of General Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1st Division in the First Wave on Omaha Beach, providing support to the landing forces. He operated 20-millimeter machine guns and supervised the small landing craft – the Higgins ships – used for amphibious landings.

“It was a general massacre where 7,000 men were killed in the first 24 hours,” recalls Dollard in a story written of her military experiences by her daughter, Elizabeth Bysiek.

After Normandy, Dollard was sent to North Africa, notably to Morocco and Algeria. He remembers crossing the Algerian mountains on horses that Allied troops found that had Nazi swastikas engraved on the flanks of the animals.

Later, in Naples, Italy, his unit recovered the 3rd Army from General George S. Patton, delivering troops to Saint-Tropez, then traveled to Marseille for Operation Dragoon on August 14, 1944, l Allied invasion of southern France. He attends a tank battle on the steps of Marseille Cathedral.

Dollard was then transferred to USS Chilton serve in the Pacific. In June 1945, while fighting the Japanese in the Battle of Okinawa, he faced the greatest bloodshed of the war. The ship was struck by a kamikaze plane and Dollard was injured, but recovered quickly.

His unit was preparing for the Allied invasion of Japan, which never took place. “Thank you Lord Harry Truman was president, or I wouldn’t be here,” he said. “I have had a lot of close calls.” The Japanese surrendered in early September 1945.

Soon after, Dollard was honorably released. He returned to the United States, re-enrolled at Notre-Dame and obtained a Bachelor of Science in Commerce. He briefly attended Notre Dame Law School, but decided that studying law was not for him.

Dollard returned home to upstate New York to run the family business, a diverse business that includes wholesale and retail meat, liquor store and real estate that he now runs. for 74 years. He married and raised a family.

The elderly veteran is one of the increasingly small group of Americans of the larger generation, those born in the first quarter of the 20th century whose lives were shaped by the Depression and service during World War II. Of the more than 16 million Americans who served in the military during that war, fewer than 300,000 are still alive, according to a 2020 report from Pew Research.

About 150 members of the Notre-Dame class of 1949 are still alive, according to records from the Association des Anciens de Notre-Dame.

Dollard’s older brother is also a graduate of Notre-Dame. Vincent Dollard ’39, passed away in May 2020 at the age of 102.

Dollard says he hopes young adults today will never have to face the dangers that the world and young men like him faced during World War II.


Margaret Fosmoe is associate editor of this magazine.


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Chess tournament strengthens ties between Israel and West African countries https://algeriatelevision.com/chess-tournament-strengthens-ties-between-israel-and-west-african-countries/ https://algeriatelevision.com/chess-tournament-strengthens-ties-between-israel-and-west-african-countries/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 15:19:00 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/chess-tournament-strengthens-ties-between-israel-and-west-african-countries/

A solidarity chess event took place between Israeli and West African chess teams on Wednesday evening as part of the Chess4Solidarity initiative.

the Chess4Solidarity Initiative was created in memory of the late Shlomo Hillel, who served as Israel’s first Ambassador to Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Hillel passed away 4 months ago.
More than 180 people from West African countries attended the event, including the countries of Niger and Algeria which do not have diplomatic relations with Israel. Long-distance chess tournament participants between Israeli and West African chess players. (Credit: Long-distance chess tournament participants between Israeli and West African chess players.)
Among the guests at the opening ceremony of the event were Ciando Popano, Minister of Tourism of Côte d’Ivoire; Natan Sharansky; Eli Etzion, president of Elitzur Israel; the African Magic System group; Leo Vinovsky, Israeli Ambassador to Côte d’Ivoire; and Lior Aizenberg, director of chess4all. The event was organized in collaboration with the Elitzur Israel Center and the Israeli embassies in Cameroon, Ivory Coast and Senegal, and “chess4all”.
This was the 21st event hosted by the Chess4Solidarity project last year, and they hosted tournaments between 90 different countries with 4,500 participants to date.

One of the judges for the long distance competition was Jonas Ben Jalon from Morocco.

A prize of $ 2,000 was awarded to outstanding students from participating countries, and the event was broadcast on Facebook pages in Senegal, Cameroon, Ivory Coast and Israel.

The first place winner of the competition was Guy Levin, 17, of Rishon Lezion, Israel, who finished with 7.5 out of 9 possible points in the main category of the event.


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Algeria: Economy – Algeria will “recover” the losses of 2020 from this year https://algeriatelevision.com/algeria-economy-algeria-will-recover-the-losses-of-2020-from-this-year/ https://algeriatelevision.com/algeria-economy-algeria-will-recover-the-losses-of-2020-from-this-year/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 13:31:29 +0000 https://algeriatelevision.com/algeria-economy-algeria-will-recover-the-losses-of-2020-from-this-year/

Algiers – The year 2021 should see a gradual return of economic activity in Algeria to levels allowing the country to “recover” the losses suffered in 2020 and to reduce the imbalance in the accounts of the State, the ministry said on Wednesday. of Finance in a press release.

“The year 2021 should see a stabilization of the fundamentals of the country’s economy, through a gradual return of economic activity to levels allowing the recovery of losses suffered in 2020 and a reduction of internal and external imbalances in the accounts. of the State ”, declared the ministry in its document which evaluates the economic and social situation of the country during the first 5 months of 2021.

This recovery follows the rebound in the global economy as the Covid 19 pandemic is under control. Positive signs may constitute a favorable outlook for the economies of developed and emerging countries.

In 2021, Algeria’s economic growth should stand at + 4.2% while the growth of hydrocarbons should reach 10.1%. Growth excluding hydrocarbons should reach + 3.2%.

In the first 5 months of 2021, the trade balance deficit has already shrunk by 68%, falling to $ 1.3 billion, with imports of $ 15.2 billion, hydrocarbon exports rising of + 32.7% and non-hydrocarbon exports up by 81.71%.

=== Tax revenue up 9.5% in 4 months ===

The rebound in Algerian economic activity is reflected in the level of tax revenues which increased by 9.5% to 807.65 billion DZD at the end of April 2021 compared to the same period 2020 (737.69 billion DZD) , specified the ministry.